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1

Sportsman. Born in Chislehurst in Kent, he was educated at Uppingham School in Berkshire, then in Germany for eighteen months and France for a year. His first job was at Lloyd\'s Corporation of Underwriters, where he worked for two years without a salary and for a third on one pound per week, which he used to fund his hobby of motor cycles. At the age of 21, he became a Member of Lloyd\'s and, shortly afterwards, made a considerable fortune by offering insurance for newspapers against libel actions. He made his first flight in 1909, in an aircraft he had built himself in a disused barn. At its first attempt, it crashed; but he rebuilt it and it flew for a hundred yards, making him one of the very first Britons to fly. His first motor race at Brooklands had taken place the previous year. In 1910, he bought a Darracq car which had won the Vanderbilt Cup in America and which could reach 100 m.p.h. Because Maurice Maeterlinck\'s play \"The Blue Bird\" was on at the Haymarket Theatre at the time, he named his car \"Bluebird\" and painted it that colour. It won the race at Brooklands, and all his future vehicles were to be given the same name. In 1912, he suffered the first of several injuries when, at Brooklands, Bluebird lost its front and back wheels on the \"off\" side, almost simultaneously. Campbell had the presence of mind to wrench the car to the edge of the track and to put the hubs on the edge of the concrete. In this way, he managed to keep the car upright and to finish the course, coming fourth. When the First World War broke out, he served as a dispatch rider before being commissioned in the Royal West Kent Regiment, then transferring to the Royal Flying Corps as a ferry pilot; later, a flying instructor. After the Armistice, Malcolm Campbell resumed his motor racing career and won four hundred trophies. In 1923 at Pendine Sands in Carmarthenshire, Wales, he was the first man to reach 150 m.p.h. At Daytona Beach in Florida, he raised ths to 206, then 246, m.p.h. On his return from the latter triumph, in 1931, he was knighted, having already received the M.B.E. for his service in the Great War. Finally, in 1935 at Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, he became the first man to exceed 300 m.p.h. After this triumph, he abandoned motor cars for motor boats. As before, all his craft were called Bluebird; and, in 1939 at Lake Coniston, he set up a world record of 141.74 m.p.h. In the General Election of 1935, he contested Deptford, in South East London, as a Conservative, but was defeated. In 1938, his novel, \"Salute to the Gods\" was filmed by MGM as \"Burn \'Em Up O\'Connor\" with Dennis O\'Keefe in the title role; and, in 1979, three decades after his death, the B.B.C dramatised his life in a play called \"Speed King\", with Robert Hardy as Sir Malcolm. This concentrated as much on his prowess in the bed-room as on his skill on the track. In addition to numerous affairs, as mentioned in the play, he was married three times. The second marriage, to Dorothy Evelyn Whittall, produced one daughter and one son, Donald (q.v.) who followed his father\'s career, but who met with an untimely end. Sir Malcolm\'s grave is in the South West of the churchyard. If you enter through the gate on Manor Park Road, turn left and he is in the third row, five graves from the left and just behind the large tomb of Thompson Bonar (q.v.).

Bio by: Iain MacFarlaine
 
Campbell, Malcolm (I225)
 
2
Daisy's mother was born in U.S.A. and her father in Wales. They owned a sheep property on Willochra Plains, then moved to Telowie when Daisy was 3. She was educated at Port Germein. The Harvey family moved to Adelaide and Daisy was courted by Correspondence and eventually Stan proposed by letter and was accepted. Stan went off to the war and returned in 1919.
Daisy had a very bright personality; she loved life and worked hard. She was an excellent tennis player, house-keeper and farmer's wife. She helped hand-milk 30 cows; during the depression she separated the milk and cream and made butter to sell to the East-West railways (one shilling per pound). She had 300 White Leghorn fowls and they produced about 10 dozen eggs per day; some were sold fresh (at about 4 pence a dozen), but Daisy pickled hundreds to be sold to bakeries in times of shortage (for about a shilling a dozen). She always had a wonderfully productive garden and was an excellent Cook.
In 1965 Daisy became very ill with insufficient blood to the brain through hardening of the arteries. She was ill for about 7 years, but for most of that time they lived in Port Lincoln. Lois Halls came to live with them to help care for Daisy. At the end of 1973 Stan admitted Daisy to Tumby Bay Hospital where she died six months later.
In 1966 Stan decided to sell the Port Germein Property and retire in Port Lincoln. Daisy was a wonderful wife, mother and grandmother. She died in 1974 after 54 years of marriage. 
Harvey, Daisy Pennia Sabina (I4813)
 
3
Lt Col FW Bell VC; obituary
The Times Saturday 1st May 1954
"Lt Col Frederick William Bell, who won the Victoria Cross for conspicuous
gallantry at Brakpan in the South African War, died at Bristol on Wednesday
at the age of 79.
He won the decoration on May 16th, 1901, at Brakpan. He was retiring under
heavy fire after holding the right flank when he saw a colleague who was
dismounted. In spite of the intensity of fire he turned about, went to the man's
aid, and took him up behind him on his horse. The weight of the two men
proved too great for the animal, which fell with them. Bell thereupon insisted
that the man should mount the horse and make his escape. Bell remained
behind and covered his retirement until he was out of danger. Bell also saw
active service in Somaliland and later in the 1914-18 War.
He later served as a political officer in British Somaliland and as an
administrative officer in both Nigeria and Kenya Colony. He retired from the
colonial service in 1925 and at the time the circumstances surrounding his
retirement received a considerable amount of prominence. The late Lord
Delamere moved a resolution in the Administrative Assembly of Kenya
drawing the attention to "the reprimand and notice of termination of his
services, given by the Government to Lt Col FW Bell VC, a District
Commissioner, following his evidence before the Masai Inquiry Committee".
The Government contended that Bell's retirement had been previously
recommended on the ground that he had reached the age limit, and that it
was not connected with the evidence that he had given." 
Bell, Frederick William (I7966)
 
4
Methodist Church Exeter, South Australia, is now known as the Uniting Church Samaphore, South Australia. 
Family (F0164)
 
5
PATRICK PLAINS

The name Saint Patrick?s Plains was bestowed upon the area possibly by John Howe, the leader of the party which first reached it in 1819 and 1820. Howe?s first expedition crossed the mountains from Windsor and arrived at the river (he didn?t then know it was the Hunter) near the present-day Jerry?s Plains. The following year with a larger group, he used a modified and somewhat easier route, and on 15th March 1820 arrived at the river downstream at Whittingham, close to the present site of Singleton.
The original name was soon shortened to Patrick Plains. Initially this name covered a very large area ? from the foothills of the range between the Hawkesbury and Hunter Rivers to the south, Maitland (then called Wallis Plains) to the east down river, and spread out into unknown country to the north and west. Districts as far afield as Scone (Invermein) and Merriwa (Gummun Plains) were included.
Other names which were used in early settlement days were Wollombi Brook and Cockfighters Creek for the areas bordering this stream. Hunters River was the name for the area along the River, not only in the Patrick Plains area but for the whole length of the valley. And Goulburn River applied to the land along this tributary. By the early 1840 many settlements and villages had developed and were named, some officially and other informally. Names the early settlers had given to their grants were frequently adopted for a wider area.
The first town, designated Whittingham by the authorities, never developed. Settlers preferred Benjamin Singleton?s chosen site where he had built his inn beside the ford. This early village had the advantage of being a good resting place for travellers and horses or bullocks before tackling the river crossing to proceed up the valley. When the first post office was set up the name Darlington was allotted to the town, but this has only persisted in a small part of what developed into the town of Singleton. By 1836 Benjamin Singleton was offering housing allotments for sale.
In 1843 a district Council of Patrick Plains was set up, and this defined the districts as covering a more compact area than in the 1820s. It still began in the range between the Hawkesbury and Hunter Rivers in the south, and the range at the head of Fal Brook in the north; Black Creek (Branxton) to the east and Jerry?s Plains to the west. These boundaries remain. When, however, the Municipality of Singleton and the Shire of Patrick Plains amalgamated in 1975. The name Singleton was retained and Patrick Plains discarded. As time goes on less and less people remember the old name, so the Family History Society of Singleton Inc decided to keep the name alive, at least in a small way. Thus our journal became ?The Patrick Plains Gazette?. 
Thorley, James Samuel (I9539)
 
6
PATRICK PLAINS

The name Saint Patrick?s Plains was bestowed upon the area possibly by John Howe, the leader of the party which first reached it in 1819 and 1820. Howe?s first expedition crossed the mountains from Windsor and arrived at the river (he didn?t then know it was the Hunter) near the present-day Jerry?s Plains. The following year with a larger group, he used a modified and somewhat easier route, and on 15th March 1820 arrived at the river downstream at Whittingham, close to the present site of Singleton.
The original name was soon shortened to Patrick Plains. Initially this name covered a very large area ? from the foothills of the range between the Hawkesbury and Hunter Rivers to the south, Maitland (then called Wallis Plains) to the east down river, and spread out into unknown country to the north and west. Districts as far afield as Scone (Invermein) and Merriwa (Gummun Plains) were included.
Other names which were used in early settlement days were Wollombi Brook and Cockfighters Creek for the areas bordering this stream. Hunters River was the name for the area along the River, not only in the Patrick Plains area but for the whole length of the valley. And Goulburn River applied to the land along this tributary. By the early 1840 many settlements and villages had developed and were named, some officially and other informally. Names the early settlers had given to their grants were frequently adopted for a wider area.
The first town, designated Whittingham by the authorities, never developed. Settlers preferred Benjamin Singleton?s chosen site where he had built his inn beside the ford. This early village had the advantage of being a good resting place for travellers and horses or bullocks before tackling the river crossing to proceed up the valley. When the first post office was set up the name Darlington was allotted to the town, but this has only persisted in a small part of what developed into the town of Singleton. By 1836 Benjamin Singleton was offering housing allotments for sale.
In 1843 a district Council of Patrick Plains was set up, and this defined the districts as covering a more compact area than in the 1820s. It still began in the range between the Hawkesbury and Hunter Rivers in the south, and the range at the head of Fal Brook in the north; Black Creek (Branxton) to the east and Jerry?s Plains to the west. These boundaries remain. When, however, the Municipality of Singleton and the Shire of Patrick Plains amalgamated in 1975. The name Singleton was retained and Patrick Plains discarded. As time goes on less and less people remember the old name, so the Family History Society of Singleton Inc decided to keep the name alive, at least in a small way. Thus our journal became ?The Patrick Plains Gazette?. 
Thorley, William (I9594)
 
7
PATRICK PLAINS

The name Saint Patrick?s Plains was bestowed upon the area possibly by John Howe, the leader of the party which first reached it in 1819 and 1820. Howe?s first expedition crossed the mountains from Windsor and arrived at the river (he didn?t then know it was the Hunter) near the present-day Jerry?s Plains. The following year with a larger group, he used a modified and somewhat easier route, and on 15th March 1820 arrived at the river downstream at Whittingham, close to the present site of Singleton.
The original name was soon shortened to Patrick Plains. Initially this name covered a very large area ? from the foothills of the range between the Hawkesbury and Hunter Rivers to the south, Maitland (then called Wallis Plains) to the east down river, and spread out into unknown country to the north and west. Districts as far afield as Scone (Invermein) and Merriwa (Gummun Plains) were included.
Other names which were used in early settlement days were Wollombi Brook and Cockfighters Creek for the areas bordering this stream. Hunters River was the name for the area along the River, not only in the Patrick Plains area but for the whole length of the valley. And Goulburn River applied to the land along this tributary. By the early 1840 many settlements and villages had developed and were named, some officially and other informally. Names the early settlers had given to their grants were frequently adopted for a wider area.
The first town, designated Whittingham by the authorities, never developed. Settlers preferred Benjamin Singleton?s chosen site where he had built his inn beside the ford. This early village had the advantage of being a good resting place for travellers and horses or bullocks before tackling the river crossing to proceed up the valley. When the first post office was set up the name Darlington was allotted to the town, but this has only persisted in a small part of what developed into the town of Singleton. By 1836 Benjamin Singleton was offering housing allotments for sale.
In 1843 a district Council of Patrick Plains was set up, and this defined the districts as covering a more compact area than in the 1820s. It still began in the range between the Hawkesbury and Hunter Rivers in the south, and the range at the head of Fal Brook in the north; Black Creek (Branxton) to the east and Jerry?s Plains to the west. These boundaries remain. When, however, the Municipality of Singleton and the Shire of Patrick Plains amalgamated in 1975. The name Singleton was retained and Patrick Plains discarded. As time goes on less and less people remember the old name, so the Family History Society of Singleton Inc decided to keep the name alive, at least in a small way. Thus our journal became ?The Patrick Plains Gazette?. 
Thorley, Phillip (I6383)
 
8 Birth - District: Portsmouth Vol:2b Page:453 Marriage - District: Portsmouth Vol:2b Page:1348 Death - District: Portsmouth Vol:20 Page:0606 1901 census: 72 Liverpool Rd, Portsmouth aged 3mths, with family and grandmother. Hopkins, Edward George B (I10407)
 
9 Birth record: Vol 2b, Page 877, Portsmouth Marriage record: Vol 2b, Page 1060, Portsmouth (to Haywood???) Death record: Reg District Portsmouth, Dis Code 497/1B, Reg No: B71A, Entry No: 142 Hopkins, James Null (I10408)
 
10 Birth record: Vol 5a Page 12 Highworth Wiltshire Marriage record: Vol 2b Page 1139 Portsea (1899) Death record: 1861 census: Wanborough, aged 4 with sister and grandparents (waite) 1871 census: Wanborough, aged 14 living with siblings and granrents (waite) 1881 census: "Minotaur" RN Vessel, Private RMLI, aged 24 1891 census: 1901 census: 42 Hawke St Portsea, aged 43 with wife and children (dropped William from his name goes by Joseph) Wait, William Joseph (I10402)
 
11 Birth record: Vol 6d, Page 696, Portsmouth Death record: Reg District Portsmouth, Dis Code 497/1A, Reg No A69A, Entry No 126 Hopkins, Thomas Charles (I10410)
 
12  Family (F3968)
 
13 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family (F3616)
 
14 A Memorial Service (no. 190075) was conducted for Alice at the Centennary Park Cremortorium on 08 November 1989. Alices ashes were laid to rest with her Husband at Grevillea Court Gardens SB 1 95. Small, Alice Grace (I3162)
 
15 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I10416)
 
16 Bronchopneumonia - (Bronchopneumonia is a type of pneumonia. Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs due to an infection caused by viruses, bacteria, or fungi. The infection causes inflammation in the alveoli in the lungs, causing the alveoi to fill with pus or fluid. The alveoli are tiny air sacs. Bronchopneumonia affects both lungs and the bronchi). Dillon, Ruby Violet Irene (I12088)
 
17 Diane called this morning. He was diagnosed with stomach cancer a couple of weeks ago, but was already struggling with bone cancer from his previous prostate cancer. Parsons, Frank (I6311)
 
18 Doris Mary Campbell (n.Hill) born 29 November 1901 Lymington, Southhampton, England, Mother Annie Elizabeth Hill (n. Lilleyand,) father George Herbert Hill, Birth Reg. district Lymington county of Southhampton UK.

In 1959 Southhampton was official incorporated into Hampshire and Lymington became part of the county of Hampshire, England. 
Hill, Doris Mary (I2215)
 
19 In 1847, there were seven Wesleyan Churches in South Aus. and Mt. Barker was one of them.

When the mill was built, it was used as a place of worship and Sunday School was also held in it. Later, a slab church was built in Cameron Street, of red gum posts with an earthen floor and bags for windows. The first stone church, which is now the Lecture Hall was opened in 1851. The Rev. J. Hall preached morning and evening, the collection for the day amounting to ?44-2-6 (a record even for today). The Rev. J. Dann, D.D., who was 21 years of age, walked from Adelaide to Mt. Barker to take charge of this church. The parsonage was built in 1857.

The present fine structure, the Dunn Memorial Church built in 1881, donated to the Mt. Barker Methodists by the late John Dunn, now stands alongside the old church.

In 1847, there were seven Wesleyan Churches in South Aus. and Mt. Barker was one of them.

When the mill was built, it was used as a place of worship and Sunday School was also held in it. Later, a slab church was built in Cameron Street, of red gum posts with an earthen floor and bags for windows. The first stone church, which is now the Lecture Hall was opened in 1851. The Rev. J. Hall preached morning and evening, the collection for the day amounting to ?44-2-6 (a record even for today). The Rev. J. Dann, D.D., who was 21 years of age, walked from Adelaide to Mt. Barker to take charge of this church. The parsonage was built in 1857.

The present fine structure, the Dunn Memorial Church built in 1881, donated to the Mt. Barker Methodists by the late John Dunn, now stands alongside the old church.

The address of the Dunn Memorial Uniting Church is 13 Mann Street Mount Barker, South Australia. 
Family (F0063)
 
20 John Henry Parnell was born at Richmond 12/9/1839. John was Dux of "The King's School" in 1856 where he received the very first Broughton Prize (Co-incidentally donated by a Mr. Charles Kemp - brother-in-law).
John never married and is not the John Henry married to Sarah Ganderton of the Shoalhaven district of NSW.
He died after the wreck of the Maria. It was claimed he was one of the parties killed by the natives mentioned in the following accounts.

John Henry in his will dated the 21/5/1866 while living at Osterley, named his brother Charles and sister-in-law Sarah as executors. He included among other assets distributed, one hundred and fifty pound to be invested and the interest to be used to maintain the joint grave of his mother and father at Morpeth. He also left one thousand pound for the education of his niece Edith.


A fellow student from "The Kings School" named Haydon was also part of the crew of the ill-fated Maria.

News Report.

Maria wrecked-39 killed SATURDAY, 30 MARCH 1872 Reports from Queensland have confirmed 39 people from the New Guinea gold expedition were killed when their 156-ton brig Maria became wrecked on Bramble Reef, off Cardwell in Queensland. In a chilling account, the expedition's storekeeper, Mr. Goble, told of the disastrous voyage of murder and mayhem when the ship sprung a leak 270 miles from New Guinea and the captain turned the boat around to head for the nearest Queensland port. The course was altered and five days afterwards on the 26th of February at 2 o'clock in the morning, a cry of "breakers under the lee bow" startled us and the skipper (who would not turn out until thus aroused).
To our legs and the deck... Three quarters of an hour passed when she began to break up astern and the water rushed in. No steps were taken to secure life.

Rafts of a shaky description were constructed under the supervision of chief mate who was crazy with excitement. Not so the members who remained cool throughout. Mr. Goble continued, "I asked what (the captain) meant to do-if he would adopt proper measures to secure as much life as possible, and stick to the wreck". He replied "that he would stick to the last"... but I had not been engaged more than 30 minutes when I was informed that the captain had left the ship with six men, taking the only boat we possessed, saying that he was going to procure assistance... this boat would have held 25 men. The two remaining boats were then lowered, and I placed a small quantity of provisions with water in each; dropped them astern ready to use and mounted guard on the taffrail with a revolver in my pocket to prevent any similar mishap occurring. Many begged me to let them into the boats, but the majority of the men behaved nobly and there were individual instances of courage and magnanimity which I shall never forget. Mr. Goble said he then loaded as many as he could on the boats with the intention of staying on the wreck with the second mate, however a strong wind pushed one boat, with only two men on board, away from the sinking ship before it could be fully loaded. He got in the other boat and chased the smaller boat, caught it and helped the two men row back to the wreck.

As they approached it, the Maria sank. 'There was no outcry, only a slight wail from those who were suddenly submerged," reported Mr. Goble. The second mate clung to the top rigging and helped those in the water to the rigging. He refused to jump in Mr. Goble's boat and save himself although many pleaded with him to think of his wife and child, but he could not be induced to leave his post, but made the others go". When the boats were filled with remaining survivors both drifted to Hinchinbrook Island and as the weather was too dangerous to travel, stayed on the island and survived on periwinkles for seven days.

When the weather had improved, they rowed to Cardwell and safety. Mr. Goble organised a steamer to survey the wreck but found nothing from the cargo could be saved. Two crewmembers of the captain's boat arrived, injured, at Cardwell. They reported their companions had landed on Hinchinbrook Island near an Aboriginal camp they said although the natives seemed friendly, they were ambushed while walking and the captain and three other crewmembers were killed.

Another survivor story.

The wreck of the Maria or Adventures of the NG Prospecting Association. They boarded the Maria on 25th January 1872. First there was an objection by the Customs to clearing the ship on account of the number of passengers. This obstacle was overcome, by pointing out that there were only 75 of them plus 3 officers, a doctor, 4 sailors and the storeman. It was just as well they took the storeman, as he turned out better than all the officers put together. The next setback occurred when departure time came and the captain didn't show, but the adventure continued.

On 1st February and for the following three days they were in the vicinity of Solitary Island. Then the wind freshened from the South and it rained, "We experienced some little annoyances during the first part of the Southerly wind, as the weather was squally. With occasionally a good deal of rain; and our decks not being the tightest in the world, we found it sometimes a little moist below; but it was a consolation to us that we could get plenty of water without the trouble of going for it, as it was only necessary to spread a water proof coat on some berth and a few gallons could be obtained in a very short time". The expedition almost reached their objective but was driven back in a gale. With the extra strain various weaknesses became apparent. The tiller and rotted sails carried away, the equally rotten rigging was in considerable need of repair.

The Maria finally struck a reef. Forster boarded the larger raft and the smaller one carried Polin, O'malley, Hardy, Dalgleish, Hooker, Angel, Thomson, Heakman, Rowe, Parnell, Williams and Grant.

The rescue.
Captain Moresby RN. Quote: - "Reaching Cardwell on March 9 we learnt of a disastrous shipwreck. Seventy-five spirited, harebrained young men from Sydney had attempted a prospecting expedition to New Guinea. They clubbed together, bought a crazy old brig (Maria) of 167 tons, and the natural result followed. She was wrecked on the Bramble Reef, about thirty miles from Cardwell, and the master, whose incapacity had caused the disaster, deserted the vessel before daybreak, taking six men with him in the best boat. Two rafts were hurriedly constructed, and barely launched when the vessel slipped off the reef and sank in deep water. Thirteen men gained one raft, twelve the other. The remaining small boat, with four or five men, reached Cardwell two days later, and gave the intelligence. Of course, assistance was at once sent to the wreck but no traces of the rafts could be seen.

However, I still entertained a hope, and determined to search in the "HMS Basilish". Calculating the effects of the winds and prevailing currents, I concluded that the rafts, unless stopped by some obstruction, would strike the mainland sixty or seventy miles north of Cardwell, and therefore I proceeded to Cooper's Point, and sent our boats north and south to examine the Coast. Our kindly paymaster, O'Neill, was the possessor of an excellent spyglass, and as a matter of personal pride allowed nothing to escape his notice. He was standing on the bridge looking about, when suddenly he cried out: " I see white men on the beach! " and our glasses, eagerly levelled confirmed the intelligence. I hurried into a boat, and taking food and wine, pulled rapidly in. As we neared, it was alarming to notice that the men seemed to have disappeared, and, a number of blacks were standing in their place, and seeing this our men gave way with a will that sent the boat flying through the water. But just as we landed they rose into sight again: they had fallen on their knees behind a rock to give thanks to the Almighty for their deliverance. Eight emaciated, half-naked creatures met us, and clasping our hands, told us that they were the only survivors of the thirteen on the larger raft. , There was no need to dwell on their sufferings; their wasted, ulcerated bodies, and the feeble voices with which they tried to raise a cheer, told that we had only reached them just in time. The wine revived them, and they were finally able to crawl along with us to the native camp, insisting that I must see how the black men had done their poor best to aid them.

The tale of the rescued men was horrible. For four days they had drifted on the raft, without a particle of food or a drop of water beyond what the rain supplied. Two died raving mad, two were drowned, and the rest were almost lifeless, when their black friends found them. In the meantime our boats had discovered the remains of the smaller raft on the beach, not more than six miles from the larger, but separated from it by a good-sized navigable river, which had prevented (providentially, as it proved) any communication between the crews.
This fine stream we named Gladys River. Further search showed that the survivors of the smaller raft had walked south. Hoping to reach Cardwell, but meeting hostile natives (probably exasperated by ill treatment) were all murdered. The master's boat landed south of Cardwell and its crew met the same fate". 
Parnell, John Henry (I9339)
 
21 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5166)
 
22 "Elizabeth's" ships log for Nominal list of deaths aboard the "Elizabeth" states:
In The Hospital on Shore
Neale, Mary age 25 
Stewart, Mary (I8425)
 
23 "Jims"funeral was conducted on 7th July 2004 at 11.15 am in the South Chapel at the Eastern Suburbs Crematorium, Military Road, Matraville, New South Wales, Australia. Sewell, James Francis (I11089)
 
24 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1522)
 
25 (a) Cachexia (weakness and wasting of the body due to severe chronic illness);

(b) Pulmonary Phthisis (phthisis - involving the lungs with progressive wasting of the body. Pulmonary tuberculosis, wasting disease, white plague, consumption). 
Kennedy, Agnes May Josephine (I6499)
 
26 12 October 1915 Allan's enlistment papers into the AIF show his postal address as Wilson Street "Highbury", Taringa, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. His next of kin is listed as Hilda Marion Manning (wife). Manning, Allan William (I7983)
 
27 1841 census: Mill Lane Highworth, aged 3 with parents and siblings (Waite) Waite, Joseph (I10309)
 
28 1871 Census has him living at 59 Bright St Oxford with his family of 5 children. Tucker, William (I0177)
 
29 1881 Census for England and Wales has him living with his mother and father at Wick Lane.
1901 Census for England and Wales has him living with his wife and child at 2 Stanmore ST Old Town Swindon.
1911 Census for England and Wales has him living with his wife and children at Tadpole Cottages, Blunsdon St Andrew, Swindon.
He was a Farmer 
Tucker, Edmund Thomas (I0148)
 
30 1881 Census of England and Wales has her and her sister Amelia living at 7 Buckingham Place, Clifton, Bristol, England Tucker, Anne Maria (I0179)
 
31 1881 Census of England and Wales shows she was living at 7 Buckingham Place, Clifton, Bristol with her sister Anne. Tucker, Amelia J (I10745)
 
32 1891 Census of England and Wales has her living at 9 St Lukes Rd, Bedminster, Bristol England with mother Maria and Brothers William and George.
1901 Census has her living at 7 Kensington Hill Brislington, Bristol, England.
1911 Census of England and Wales shows her living at Oxford House, Kensington Hill, Bristol, England. 
Family (F0057)
 
33 1901 Census of England and Wales shows him living at 37 Percy St Bristol. His occupation shows as a stoker stationary engine Tucker, Alfred John (I10746)
 
34 1911 Census had him living at Moor Leaze Cottages, Liddington Wick, Swindon. 1901 Census had him living at 6 Woodbine Terrace, Chisledon, Swindon. With his family. 1891 Census had him living at 84 Coate cottages, Chisledon, Swindon. 1881 Census had him living at Wick Lane, Liddington, Swindon Tucker, William John (I0147)
 
35 1912 'The Adelaide Chronicle":
Marriage: The Blyth Lutheran Church was the scene of an interesting wedding on July 3, When Mr. Hurtle Tiller, second son of Mr. Wm. Tiller, "Werocata View", Balaklava, was married to Miss Meta Beckmann, "Avera" Blyth. The officiating minister was the Rev. C. Lee, of Balaklava (Methodist). The bride who was given away by her father, wore a pretty white Oriental satin frock with long train. The bodice was made with a crossover effect, and trimmed with embroidered chiffon, the yoke, collar and cuffs being composed of fine net. The skirt was made in the tunic style and trimmed with deep pearl fringe. She also wore the orthodox veil and wreath of orange blossom, and carried a lovely horseshoe. Her gift from the bridegroom was a ring. She was attended by two bridesmaids and a little page. Miss Hilda Beckmann, younger sister of bride, acted as first bridesmaid, and Miss Ada Tiller, sister of bridegroom, second. They were dressed in white china silk frocks, with crossover bodices, trimmed with silver tinsel net and bead embroidery and gold respectively. Both wore large black Tagel straw hats, trimmed with cord and feathers to match, and carried floral horseshoes. They were presented by the bridegroom with brooches. The flower girl, Miss Lily Tiller (sister of the bridegroom), looked a pretty little maid in palest pink Japanese silk, made in the Empire style and wearing a dainty pink silk straw bonnet. She carried a basket of pink roses and stocks. The bridegroom was attended by his brother (Mr Roy Tiller) as best man, and Mr Arthur Beckmann as groomsman. After the ceremony the guests adjourned to "Avera", the residence of the bride's parents, where a sumptuous breakfast was partaken of, the tables being effectively decorated with silver wattle and pink geraniums, the bridal table being carried out with white marguerites and fern. After the usual toasts had been honoured, the guests all joined in singing "They are jolly good fellows". A move was then made to the dining room, where the wedding gifts were on view, and were costly and varied in number. In the evening, dancing, games and musical items were indulged in. The music was supplied for the dancing by Mr. C. Milde, Messrs. Cavanagh and Farrow acted as M.C. The bride and bridegroom then left for their future home, "Fair View", Balaklava. The bride's going away dress was a navy coat and skirt, blue hat to match, trimmed cord and wings. Mrs Beckmann, bride's mother, was gowned in black silk trimmed with silk fringe and sequin embroidery. Miss Beckmann (sister of the bride) wore grey silk with braid and buttons, Mrs. Tiller (mother of bridegroom) had on black surah silk trimmed with silk insertion. Mr Cavanagh, navy coat and skirt. Miss Vera Tiller, pale blue striped voile; hat to match. Mrs. Beckmann (Arthurton) black silk and juet trimming. Mrs Mugge, black silk, Mrs J. Clarke, black silk, Mrs O Beckmann, black silk, Mrs H Matticke (Freeling), black silk, Mrs R.C. Tiller was in vieux rose, trimmed with black satin and fringe. Mrs Hawkins (Warnertown) black surah silk, Miss O. Veitch, black velvet coat and skirt, Miss Ivy Veitch wore prunell. The Misses Zweck (Gawler) had on dainty dresses of cream voile banded with whit satin, the Misses Zweck (Blyth) wore cream frocks trimmed cord. Mrs Redpath (Hoyleton), silver grey, Mrs. W. Longmire, grey trimmed braid and buttons. Mrs. W. Evans Looked well in black, The daughter (Miss Mary), blue, Mrs. Stan Tiller grey coat and skirt, Miss Mugge wore a heliotrope dress trimmed with silver sequins. Miss Ruby Mugge grey. Miss Daisy Clark, pale blue piped with white silk, Mrs. T. Roberts, grey dress. Miss Ellie Mattiske (Freeling), grey striped material. Miss Clark (Windsor), cream frock trimmed with silk braid and buttons, Miss Tucker (Balaklava) cream Sicilian. Amongst the gentlemen were Messrs, Mattiske (4), Mr. P. Beckmann, Messrs A and S Tiller, Longmire, E.C. Beckmann, P.O. Tiller, J.S. Cavanagh, Evans (2), F. Wiltshire, Pearce, and Zweck (3).

The following are some recollections of Hurtle as recorded by his daughter - in - law Meredith

When Hurtle left school at the age of 13 he was still so small that he could not lift a bag of wheat. Bag sewing was chore that had to be done, usually in excessive heat. They used a Rugby truck which had it own air-conditioning! There were no doors! His brother, Rex, was innovative: he bought a rubber-tyre International tractor for 600 pounds, the first in the district, and defied public opinion by working it over sand hills with ease, Now everyone owns one! It was originally assumed that there would be insufficient traction to grip and pull.

Rex converted a harvester, Model Big E which superceded a previous model Little E which had a 6 foot comb, Big E had a 9 foot comb. Rex altered it from a ground drive to a power take-off which had not been seen in the district before, maybe not anywhere. This served the purpose of also cleaning the grain, almost like the later Hannaford Grain System of cleaning which is now superceded by adding chemicals as the grain is sewn, instead of immediately after it has been reaped. Another previously used Method of cleaning the grain was by turning the hand winnover.

Hurtle and his brothers built three houses. They quarried the stone with pick and shovel and crowbar, and loaded it by hand on to a wagon, They carted it to the site of the house and unloaded it again by hand. The evidence of the quarrying is still visible. They all agreed not to build a fourth!

Hurtle and his family attended the Methodist Church at Woodlands. Hurtle remembers having to recite verses of the Bible at Sunday School. One favourite was a verse with two worked in it ("Jesus wept"), but this was removed as an option. Hurtle was not a sportsman: When he was young enough he didn't have the time; when he had the time, he was too old to play.

Two incidents involved lightening. The first was at the end of May, Hurtles team was struck in the paddock while seeding with with a team of horses, eleven abreast. The lightening killed the first horse, missed the second, killed the third and then the current came back onto the wet reigns throwing Hurtle off the back of the combine, leaving him unconscious. When he regained consciousness he found his way home still dazed, leaving his horses in the paddock. Two hours later he returned with his brothers to find the horses still standing motionless in the same spot. The next day he replaced the horses and continued working.

On the second Occasion he went to feed the horses during a thunderstorm, stopped to wash his hands at the outside wash basin and was struck by lightening while bending over the bowl washing the back of his neck. This left a severe scar, the result of the burn. Peter also had an encounter with lightening; his car was struck while he was returning home from a meeting in February. (information obtained from "The Tucker Family in Australia" 1992). 
Tiller, Hurtle Alfred (I0367)
 
36 1913, State electoral roll, District of Mudgee, Roll of Electors who vote at Lawson\'s Creek Polling-Place.
Roll No. 29 Margaret Emma Grady.
Roll No. 30 Michael Grady. 
Grady, Michael (I10925)
 
37 1931 New South Wales Electoral Roll of Parramatta, Sub Division of Seven Hills.
Electoral Roll No. 6616 Ada Amelia Moren
Electoral Roll No. 6617 Frederick Moren
Electoral Roll No 6618 Olga Louise Moren. 
Moren, Frederick (I12476)
 
38 1931 New South Wales, Electoral Roll for Parramatta, Subdivision of Seven Hills, Electoral Roll No. 6616 Ada Amelia Moren, 92 Flushcombe Rd, Blacktown. Jackson, Ada Amelia (I10723)
 
39 21 january 1970 Died suddenly at her home at 10 King Street Gardiner, Victoria, Australia Amsden, Inez Edna Sadie Marguerite (I71)
 
40 2110 Private F.G. Banks enlisted in the A.I.F. 31/1/1915, one month before his eighteenth birthday. He said he was 18.5 as shown on the pay book. He embarked 21/9/1915 for Gallipolli and active service in Egypt and France. He was in the 27th Infantry Battalion. (The Tucker Family in Australia, 1992) Banks, Frederick George (I3746)
 
41 22nd December 1943 embarked on the Troop Ship "Canberra", at Port Morseby,New Guinea, Disembarking at Cairns, Queensland, Australia the same Day (22 December 1943). Kerney, Ambrose Albert (I11548)
 
42 26th Battalion

The 26th Battalion was raised at Enoggera, Queensland, in April 1915 from recruits enlisted in Queensland and Tasmania, and formed part of the 7th Brigade. It left Australia in July, and, after training in Egypt, landed at Gallipoli on 12 September. At Gallipoli, the 26th played a purely defensive role and at various times was responsible for the defence of Courtney?s and Steele?s Posts, and Russell?s Top. It withdrew from the peninsula on 12 December. 
Muir, George Washington (I7739)
 
43 3rd Child of Samual Warburton Warburton, Elizabeth Alice (I10502)
 
44 60TH BIRTHDAY AT KYBUNGA

On Saturday evening Mrs. Penfold of Balaklava was tendered a 60th birthday party at the home of her brother Mr. Inman Tucker of Kybunga. Brothers and sisters, sons and daughters of the guest were present at a birthday tea which was held in Mrs. tucker's spacious dining room. After tea, community singing was enjoyed by old and young, being supplied by Miss Coulls of Adelaide. Later in the evening those wishing to dance went to the Tucker Barn, where dancing was enjoyed until supper time. A presentation was made to Mrs Penfold by Mr J.C. Tucker, brother of the guest and many other useful presents were also given to her. Mrs Penfold very ably and suitably responded. Supper was served and Mrs Penfold lit the 60 candles and cut the 2 tier cake made and decorated by Mrs Alf Clarke. All present sang 'For she's a jolly good fellow' thus bringing the happy evening to a close. Mr F.J. Clarke was MC. Among those present were Mrs Penfold, Messrs and Mesdames E. Cunningham and family, B. Duke (Blyth), I. Tucker, W.T. Clarke, E.I. Tucker, E. Arbon and J Mitchell, Mesdames Jenna (Sevenhills), Taylor and Coulls (Adelaide), M. Shrubsole, E. Clarke and A. Clarke, Misses M. Clarke, M. and G. Clarke, E.HJ. and I Arbon and J. Duke (Blyth), Coulls (Adelaide) and L. Tucker; Messrs R. Penfold, J.C. Tucker, F.J. Clarke, H. Duke and R. Arbon(Blyth) and Tucker. (The Tucker Family in Australia, 1992) 
Tucker, Sarah (I2465)
 
45 63277 Private Stanley Greene enlisted in the AIF on 10 June 1918 at Smithton Tasmania Australia serving in the 12 Battalion in France until his discharge on 18 Oct 1919. Greene, Stanley Hatton (Hadan) (I10734)
 
46 A charwoman, char or (ironically or in genteel phrasing) charlady is an English house cleaner. The term has the same roots as "chore woman", one hired to do odd chores around the house. A char or chare was a turn (of work) in the sixteenth century,[1] which gave rise to the word being used as a prefix to denote people working in domestic service. The usage of "charwoman" was common in the mid-19th century, often appearing as an occupation in the English census of 1841, but it fell out of common use in the later decades of the 20th century, often replaced by the term "daily (woman)". Unlike a maid or housekeeper, typically live-in positions, the charwoman usually worked for hourly wages, usually on a part-time basis, often having several different employers. Tucker, Ann (I269)
 
47 A coroners Inquest was held in the "council room of the G.W.R. Mechanics' Institution, Swindon into the death of John Tucker, aged 60 years of Coate near Swindon who was run over and killed by an engine crane on the G.W.R. line at Swindon on Wednesday Morning, 20 Mar 1907. This report was published in The Swindon
Advertiser Newspaper, Friday, March 29, 1907, page 3. 
Tucker, John (I0145)
 
48 A funeral service for Robert Potts was held at St Patricks Catholic Church, Lithgow, New South Wales, Australia, at 11am and on completion proceded to the Catholic portion of Bowenfels Cemetery, New South Wales for interment. Potts, Robert (I6409)
 
49 A funeral service was conducted for Mary Ann Sly (n. Walden) at 2.30pm, Tuesday, 1st August 1933 at St Peter's,Church of England, Richmond, New South Wales, Australia. Walden, Mary Ann (I6388)
 
50 A Hospital was first opened at Latrobe in 1889 called the Devon Cottage Hospital. It was relocated to a larger site in 1903 and was renamed the Devon Public Hospital.
In 1961 the Mersey General hospital was opened at the current site and was later named the Mersey Community Hospital. 
Griffiths, Edwin John (I11437)
 

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